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  • Research shows that trust within an organisation is critically important for successfully navigating crises and disruption. Management expert from The University of Queensland Business School, Professor Nicole Gillespie, shares insights on how leaders can maintain employee trust during the current COVID-19 crises.
  • Platforms like Airbnb are reshaping traditional employment models and opening up new opportunities – but do they really offer the freedom they promise or are they a threat to workers’ rights?
  • It is one of the fastest growing entertainment industries, yet esports lacks regulation and governance, leaving it open for unethical practices and risky behaviours. Although esports is fast becoming mainstream, it still operates in a world of its own, where none of the usual rules apply.
  • Traditional business thinking often operates with a one-eyed pursuit of economic growth, trapping leaders in a world that no longer exists. A new model by entrepreneur expert, Dr Lance Newey aims to offer a better way forward.
  • A new, high-value asset is being traded on global markets. Described as ‘the new oil’, data has powered the growth of digital giants like Amazon, Google and Facebook by allowing them to target customers more effectively and boost sales. Companies need to develop a more ethical approach or face a backlash, says UQ Business School data expert Dr Ida Someh.
  • Corporate scandals are often blamed on a couple of ‘bad apples’ in the ranks of management, but they are usually indicative of a larger fault in the system. Research shows how to avoid them by designing organisations with trust embedded in the foundations.
  • How can organisations restore confidence in the wake of a scandal? Recent research from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School has identified a number of different approaches organisations can take.
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."
  • Millions of Australians are involved in community sport, yet clubs’ existence often depends on alcohol sales and sponsorship.

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  • Insider trading comes in two main forms: arguably legal and clearly illegal. But, as with drugs in sport, it’s hard to tell when arguably legal ends and clearly illegal begins. Associate Professor Barry Oliver sheds light on new research how some CEOs are walking a thin line when it comes to insider trading.
  • The view from Wall Street: Cryptocurrencies are here to stay, but the future of the technology may not reflect the disruptive vision of its founders, say UQ Business School Honorary Fellow, Dr Rand Low and alumnus, Emeritus Professor Terry Marsh.
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."
  • Fintech offers easy access to banking for millions of people in developing countries, but regulators need to find better ways to address the risks, says Dr Mamiza Haq
  • Brokers are the most popular way to find a home loan, but a new report suggests that banks should sell direct to the public instead. Professor Allan Hodgson asks if phasing out brokers could reduce competition and result in a worse deal for home buyers and smaller banks alike.
  • As the system behind Bitcoin, blockchain was once seen as the domain of arms dealers and money launderers. However it is now recognised as an important technology in its own right.
  • Australia’s financial regulator has clashed with the big four banks over their refusal to offer tracker mortgages. However, Associate Professor David Tripe and Dr Mamiza Haq argue that trackers could lead to trouble ahead for both banks and customers alike.
  • Aristotle's writings still have relevance for business today, says Professor Bernard McKenna. Perhaps the CEOs of the big banks ought to read them.
  • As finance departments face ever greater reporting demands, it is time to rethink the whole finance function and find ways to cut costs and improve the quality of management information.

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  • Change creates demand for new products and services as well as opportunities to use resources in new ways. Understanding how different changes will affect your business and what to do about it is crucial to not only surviving but benefiting from that change.
  • Even though we interact with some form of artificial intelligence (AI) every day, a new report from UQ Business School researchers discovered two-thirds of Australians don’t trust AI systems. This raises the question: What does this mean for the future of Australian businesses?
  • As Australia emerges from a winter hibernation unlike any experienced before, many small businesses are struggling to stay afloat. Top UQ business and law experts share their top strategies to help small businesses take stock, pivot and innovate to avoid an insolvency spiral.
  • Game-changing technologies offer huge benefits for society, such as a vaccine for COVID-19, but bringing them to market can be a long and arduous journey. New research suggests ways to overcome the barriers.
  • Achieving constant economic growth is unrealistic in a world with finite resources. But how do we change mindsets and limit consumption in a fair and acceptable way? Dr Cle-Anne Gabriel analyses models of business within a ‘degrowth’ economy.
  • Technology has severed the chains which once bound workers to their desks. Today your fellow team members could be operating from almost any location – the coffee shop around the corner, or the other side of the world.
  • Traditional business thinking often operates with a one-eyed pursuit of economic growth, trapping leaders in a world that no longer exists. A new model by entrepreneur expert, Dr Lance Newey aims to offer a better way forward.
  • Innovation is the holy grail for today’s businesses – the hidden force that helps them adapt to changing demand, drive sustained growth and dominate their markets. So why are some companies able to continually reinvent themselves and stay at the forefront of their industry when others struggle to keep up?
  • Business model innovation can allow companies to transcend the competition and dominate their industry. However, not all innovations are created equal. Here is some advice on how to press the reset button.

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  • Most people say they care about their personal information being shared online. However, a much smaller percentage of people actually take the necessary actions to preserve their privacy. Dr Ivano Bongiovanni discusses why actions don’t always match beliefs when it comes to data.
  • Cancel culture — withdrawing support for public figures when they do or say something offensive — has become so widespread it was Macquarie Dictionary’s 2019 word of the year. Marketing expert, Dr Alison Joubert from The University of Queensland Business School explains how this trend is affecting society and marketers.
  • Game-changing technologies offer huge benefits for society, such as a vaccine for COVID-19, but bringing them to market can be a long and arduous journey. New research suggests ways to overcome the barriers.
  • Non-humans are moving into frontline roles. But would you really want to work with a robot – and can they offer long-term value to a business? New research helps leaders prepare for the future workforce.
  • Today there is no such thing as a product-only business, according to a new approach that aims to encourage innovation. Many manufactured products including TVs, mobile phones and ‘smart’ devices are there to deliver a service, yet often the service element is greater and more profitable than the product itself.
  • Despite a series of suicides by high-profile chefs, conditions have not improved in Australian restaurant kitchens according to one UQ Business School researcher who is exploring ways to create change.
  • Platforms like Airbnb are reshaping traditional employment models and opening up new opportunities – but do they really offer the freedom they promise or are they a threat to workers’ rights?
  • What will service look like in the future? Top international researchers came together at a thought leadership conference to predict the future of service; identifying key trends, how service firms will change and what role technology will play in 2050.
  • As the ‘experience economy’ gathers pace, The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School tourism experts Dr Karen Hughes and Associate Professor David Solnet explain what businesses can learn from Disney’s approach to welcoming thousands of visitors into their theme parks every day.

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