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  • Game-changing technologies offer huge benefits for society, such as a vaccine for COVID-19, but bringing them to market can be a long and arduous journey. New research suggests ways to overcome the barriers.
  • In the wake of the devastating bushfires, the challenge is not just to replace the burnt-out properties but also to rebuild the businesses and economy these communities rely on, which tourism plays a vital part in.
  • Innovation is the holy grail for today’s businesses – the hidden force that helps them adapt to changing demand, drive sustained growth and dominate their markets. So why are some companies able to continually reinvent themselves and stay at the forefront of their industry when others struggle to keep up?
  • Business model innovation can allow companies to transcend the competition and dominate their industry. However, not all innovations are created equal. Here is some advice on how to press the reset button.
  • Is the digital hospital roll out helping to improve patient care, or is it a waste of public money? A report by UQ Business School expert offers an independent verdict.
  • An economist is returning to his roots to explore ways to help smallholder family farms to innovate, improve productivity and increase family income.
  • Innovation has never been more important or moved so fast. Here Professor Mark Dodgson, an internationally renowned innovation expert from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School, outlines the latest thinking on innovation, based on current research and insights from the technology revolutions in the past.
  • It’s blamed for pushing up property prices and squeezing out locals, yet Airbnb and similar platforms could offer potential community and economic benefits too. Should Australia follow American cities and regulate short-term rentals?
  • Facebook offers new ways to communicate in a crisis. Research reveals how to use it effectively.

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  • Change is coming. Corporations are having to rethink their business model and build resilience to incorporate sustainable business strategies. However, 'going green' can also offer competitive advantages for organisations, fueling new product and market opportunities.
  • Major sporting events cost millions, but their impact is often confined to the host city. New research has revealed how other areas can be winners too.
  • Cost overruns are threatening investment in the oil and gas industry. Does this mean a shift overseas? If companies focus on innovation, collaboration and deepening competitive capabilities, Australia's energy industry can continue to compete globally.
  • Working with local communities is different to dealing with other types of customers or stakeholders. However the ability to engage with them and win their support is a valuable skill that offers opportunities to generate both profit and social value, says social entrepreneurship expert Dr Lance Newey.
  • While companies in general have been slow to embrace sustainability, some corporates and smaller companies have placed it at the heart of their business and are now using it to develop new markets and secure their long-term future. Others can follow their example by starting with a few simple steps.
  • The increase in extreme weather indicates that climate change is already here, yet so far there has been little discussion of how it will affect business. The Climate Resilient Organization, a new book by Dr Martina Linnenluecke and Professor Andrew Griffiths of UQ Business School, considers what actions companies can take. In this interview, Dr Linnenluecke explains why they need to adapt and build their resilience.
  • The carbon tax, the cost of raw materials, lobbying from environmentalists: the pressure on business to be environmentally responsible is intense. But can sustainable development – the combination of economic growth and ecological balance – be a business reality? UQ Business School’s Professor Peter Clarkson asks under what circumstances business can turn green practice into profit?
  • Recent research emerging from the UQ Business School shows that companies large and small are finding innovative and unique responses to the challenges and broader issues of sustainability and climate change.
  • This month the Green Buildings Council of Australia launches the pilot Green Stars – Communities initiative, an independent, national scheme that aims to certify the sustainability of community level projects. Associate Professor Clive Warren at UQ Business School, an expert in green building rating in the commercial office space, asks: who needs a green star rating and how do we know what it’s worth?

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  • We asked 4 successful board members from ASX, not-for-profit, technology, marketing, sporting, defence and tourism companies to share their best boardroom communication strategies gained from personal experience to help you get your idea across the line.
  • “Fake it until you make it!” It’s a mantra you’ve probably had to put into action at some point during your career. But what happens when you just can’t shake the feeling of self-doubt? You may be dealing with imposter syndrome. The encouraging news is, you’re not alone.
  • Regulating team moods is one of the most important roles for leaders, but they can pay a heavy price. Here are a few tips on how to be effective and avoid burn-out.
  • International forces are reshaping the world of business, but also creating new opportunities and a more level playing field for small firms.
  • Leaders and teams have been tested more than ever before during the pandemic, as they've navigated hardship, dealt with increased levels of remote work and attempted to balance personal wellbeing. To help leaders adapt and continue to succeed in uncertain times, UQ Business School researchers share the top 5 leadership trends that will dominate the future business landscape.
  • The global COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a series of changes to the way we work. From suddenly managing teams working remotely to employees experiencing hardship – the crisis has led to many new leadership challenges. According to Professor Neal Ashkanasy (OAM), leaders now more than ever need to have a sharpened awareness of emotional intelligence and how to use it.
  • Research shows that trust within an organisation is critically important for successfully navigating crises and disruption. Management expert from The University of Queensland Business School, Professor Nicole Gillespie, shares insights on how leaders can maintain employee trust during the current COVID-19 crises.
  • In the wake of the devastating bushfires, the challenge is not just to replace the burnt-out properties but also to rebuild the businesses and economy these communities rely on, which tourism plays a vital part in.
  • Frontier businesses are making money and creating wellbeing at the same time, thanks to a recognition that the two factors are deeply interconnected according to new research. The study worked with 117 leaders from Alaska, India and Norway.

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  • Most people say they care about their personal information being shared online. However, a much smaller percentage of people actually take the necessary actions to preserve their privacy. Dr Ivano Bongiovanni discusses why actions don’t always match beliefs when it comes to data.
  • Insider trading comes in two main forms: arguably legal and clearly illegal. But, as with drugs in sport, it’s hard to tell when arguably legal ends and clearly illegal begins. Associate Professor Barry Oliver sheds light on new research how some CEOs are walking a thin line when it comes to insider trading.
  • There is growing evidence and concern that the algorithms and data underpinning AI can produce bias and ethical injustice. Associate Professor Sarah Kelly discusses the governance and data management considerations necessary to ensuring the ethical implementation of AI.
  • As Australia readjusts to drastic measures announced by the Federal Government to close many businesses for the next few months, food delivery workers have become an essential service to an isolated population. But little thought has been given to this front line workforce, who are putting themselves at risk, without basic employee rights.
  • Game-changing technologies offer huge benefits for society, such as a vaccine for COVID-19, but bringing them to market can be a long and arduous journey. New research suggests ways to overcome the barriers.
  • Non-humans are moving into frontline roles. But would you really want to work with a robot – and can they offer long-term value to a business? New research helps leaders prepare for the future workforce.
  • Platforms like Airbnb are reshaping traditional employment models and opening up new opportunities – but do they really offer the freedom they promise or are they a threat to workers’ rights?
  • From introducing robots in the workplace to persuading humans to work alongside them, leaders need to prepare for the brave new world ahead. But what skills will be most important for leaders as these technologies develop?
  • A new, high-value asset is being traded on global markets. Described as ‘the new oil’, data has powered the growth of digital giants like Amazon, Google and Facebook by allowing them to target customers more effectively and boost sales. Companies need to develop a more ethical approach or face a backlash, says UQ Business School data expert Dr Ida Someh.

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  • There’s a long list of corporate scandals that have damaged public trust in respected businesses. Research suggests that corporate wrongdoing is often due to ‘ethical blind spots’ rather than wilful misconduct.
  • Despite a series of suicides by high-profile chefs, conditions have not improved in Australian restaurant kitchens according to one UQ Business School researcher who is exploring ways to create change.
  • It is one of the fastest growing entertainment industries, yet esports lacks regulation and governance, leaving it open for unethical practices and risky behaviours. Although esports is fast becoming mainstream, it still operates in a world of its own, where none of the usual rules apply.
  • A new, high-value asset is being traded on global markets. Described as ‘the new oil’, data has powered the growth of digital giants like Amazon, Google and Facebook by allowing them to target customers more effectively and boost sales. Companies need to develop a more ethical approach or face a backlash, says UQ Business School data expert Dr Ida Someh.
  • Corporate scandals are often blamed on a couple of ‘bad apples’ in the ranks of management, but they are usually indicative of a larger fault in the system. Research shows how to avoid them by designing organisations with trust embedded in the foundations.

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