Momentum

Keeping you up-to-date on the latest business thinking, research insights and expert opinion. Subscribe to get Momentum updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe

Pages

Pages

  • With the right planning, a business can build information resilience to make embracing new technologies less risky, according to technology leadership expert, Professor Shazia Sadiq.
  • Research shows that trust within an organisation is critically important for successfully navigating crises and disruption. Management expert from The University of Queensland Business School, Professor Nicole Gillespie, shares insights on how leaders can maintain employee trust during the current COVID-19 crises.
  • Platforms like Airbnb are reshaping traditional employment models and opening up new opportunities – but do they really offer the freedom they promise or are they a threat to workers’ rights?
  • It is one of the fastest growing entertainment industries, yet esports lacks regulation and governance, leaving it open for unethical practices and risky behaviours. Although esports is fast becoming mainstream, it still operates in a world of its own, where none of the usual rules apply.
  • Traditional business thinking often operates with a one-eyed pursuit of economic growth, trapping leaders in a world that no longer exists. A new model by entrepreneur expert, Dr Lance Newey aims to offer a better way forward.
  • A new, high-value asset is being traded on global markets. Described as ‘the new oil’, data has powered the growth of digital giants like Amazon, Google and Facebook by allowing them to target customers more effectively and boost sales. Companies need to develop a more ethical approach or face a backlash, says UQ Business School data expert Dr Ida Someh.
  • Corporate scandals are often blamed on a couple of ‘bad apples’ in the ranks of management, but they are usually indicative of a larger fault in the system. Research shows how to avoid them by designing organisations with trust embedded in the foundations.
  • How can organisations restore confidence in the wake of a scandal? Recent research from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School has identified a number of different approaches organisations can take.
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."

Pages

  • Why there's never been a better time to experiment with Non Fungible Tokens (NFTS) and three ways your brand can get started.
  • From millennials to boomers, everyday people are using readily-accessible technology and a shared sense of disenfranchisement to beat the Bastille of Wall Street. Their actions are likely to shape the future of financial service as we know it.
  • Insider trading comes in two main forms: arguably legal and clearly illegal. But, as with drugs in sport, it’s hard to tell when arguably legal ends and clearly illegal begins. Associate Professor Barry Oliver sheds light on new research how some CEOs are walking a thin line when it comes to insider trading.
  • The view from Wall Street: Cryptocurrencies are here to stay, but the future of the technology may not reflect the disruptive vision of its founders, say UQ Business School Honorary Fellow, Dr Rand Low and alumnus, Emeritus Professor Terry Marsh.
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."
  • Fintech offers easy access to banking for millions of people in developing countries, but regulators need to find better ways to address the risks, says Dr Mamiza Haq
  • Brokers are the most popular way to find a home loan, but a new report suggests that banks should sell direct to the public instead. Professor Allan Hodgson asks if phasing out brokers could reduce competition and result in a worse deal for home buyers and smaller banks alike.
  • As the system behind Bitcoin, blockchain was once seen as the domain of arms dealers and money launderers. However it is now recognised as an important technology in its own right.
  • Australia’s financial regulator has clashed with the big four banks over their refusal to offer tracker mortgages. However, Associate Professor David Tripe and Dr Mamiza Haq argue that trackers could lead to trouble ahead for both banks and customers alike.

Pages

Pages

Pages

Pages

Pages