Momentum

The Business School Magazine

Keeping you up-to-date on the latest business thinking, research insights and expert opinion. Subscribe to get Momentum updates delivered straight to your inbox.

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  • Businesses and professionals beware - the forces of disruption are heading this way. Here are the some of the key changes that you need to be aware of to safeguard your company and your career.
  • As the ‘experience economy’ gathers pace, The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School tourism experts Dr Karen Hughes and Associate Professor David Solnet explain what businesses can learn from Disney’s approach to welcoming thousands of visitors into their theme parks every day.
  • The view from Wall Street: Cryptocurrencies are here to stay, but the future of the technology may not reflect the disruptive vision of its founders, say UQ Business School Honorary Fellow, Dr Rand Low and alumnus, Emeritus Professor Terry Marsh.
  • Market segmentation is behind the success of some of the world’s leading brands. Now a new book outlines how other businesses can benefit from the same approach.
  • How can organisations restore confidence in the wake of a scandal? Recent research from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School has identified a number of different approaches organisations can take.
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."
  • An economist is returning to his roots to explore ways to help smallholder family farms to innovate, improve productivity and increase family income.
  • Having the motivation to persevere in pursuit of an idea is critical for entrepreneurs – but how can you be sure that you are not throwing good money after bad?
  • A study which set out to investigate what holds back women’s careers offers some useful insights into how to build confidence in children of both sexes.

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  • Robots are moving off the assembly line, into other areas of work. Businesses will need to adapt to take advantage of the benefits that robots can offer, while managing the impact on their human workforce. The mantras of organisational change management, leadership and culture will take on new and very real meaning.
  • Between us we’ve downloaded 11 apps for every man, woman and child on earth - and not everyone has a smart phone. Yet. We take a look at a few apps that are emerging for business use. It’s just a sample. Do you have more to add?
  • In the 1950s Australia was the lucky country. Under Hawke we became the clever country. But are good fortune and bright ideas enough? UQ Business School's Professor Mark Dodgson argues that we must become the innovative country since innovation is the driver of future economic growth.
  • NEXT? began with a question at UQ Business School. What if we gathered the brightest future-thinkers and discussed what’s next for business?
  • Cost overruns are threatening investment in the oil and gas industry. Does this mean a shift overseas? If companies focus on innovation, collaboration and deepening competitive capabilities, Australia's energy industry can continue to compete globally.
  • To fuel the innovation process, you need a whole stack of ideas, some great, some just worth a try. We ask businesses how they capture the great ideas floating in and around their organisations and turn them into small steps to better business or game changing innovations.
  • Competition among not-for-profits is tough. Success can depend on a strong brand, smart marketing and transparent corporate governance, as much as it does in any commercial business. But it's not enough to earn a great name. You have to keep it. Surf Life Saving Australia is learning tough lessons, the hard way.
  • How can a small firm with a second-rate product challenge big business and end up dominating the market? Disruption - the concept often used to explain such shifts - is now at the centre of a heated debate.
  • In our third issue of Momentum, we challenge business to consider: ‘What’s next?’
    At UQ Business School, it’s not merely a question, it‘s our strategic position.

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  • Renowned business mentor John Bittleston has had a business career spanning 60 years. In his latest article he discusses the challenges facing SMEs, and explains why managers need to learn disobedience and improve their forecasting skills.
  • While women still face barriers to the boardroom, there are some things they can do to help their career progress. A leadership expert gives five tips for those who want to move up the ladder.
  • In the wake of the GFC, businesses are under pressure to improve corporate governance. But while some complain of the added burden, others are starting to appreciate the benefits.
  • We clock up 189 million hours of online video each year in Australia. Business and corporate videos are the second most popular content category, after entertainment. Do you know where to look for the latest and greatest online business video insights?
  • Ask a management consultant a question and what are you likely to get? A bill. Is the management consultancy industry listening to its own (often expensive) advice and becoming agile, innovative and customer focussed in the face of uncertainty and rapid change?
  • Credit rating agencies wield considerable power in the global financial system. With one of the big three agencies, Standard & Poor’s, being sued for $5 billion by the US department of justice, we look at what credit ratings do and why they are all over the news.
  • In an age where syndicated content is increasing and journalists at major news outlets are being asked to produce more with declining resources, the alternative voice and subject matter offered by independent publishers is needed more than ever.
  • The appointment of a CEO is a landmark event for any company but the selection process is generally shrouded in secrecy.
  • Only one in four employees is fully engaged at work. New research shows that having staff who share the company’s values is key to improving motivation and suggests that businesses may need to review their recruitment policies.

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