Momentum

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  • In the wake of the devastating bushfires, the challenge is not just to replace the burnt-out properties but also to rebuild the businesses and economy these communities rely on, which tourism plays a vital part in.
  • Frontier businesses are making money and creating wellbeing at the same time, thanks to a recognition that the two factors are deeply interconnected according to new research. The study worked with 117 leaders from Alaska, India and Norway.
  • There’s a long list of corporate scandals that have damaged public trust in respected businesses. Research suggests that corporate wrongdoing is often due to ‘ethical blind spots’ rather than wilful misconduct.
  • Non-humans are moving into frontline roles. But would you really want to work with a robot – and can they offer long-term value to a business? New research helps leaders prepare for the future workforce.
  • Today there is no such thing as a product-only business, according to a new approach that aims to encourage innovation. Many manufactured products including TVs, mobile phones and ‘smart’ devices are there to deliver a service, yet often the service element is greater and more profitable than the product itself.
  • Achieving constant economic growth is unrealistic in a world with finite resources. But how do we change mindsets and limit consumption in a fair and acceptable way? Dr Cle-Anne Gabriel analyses models of business within a ‘degrowth’ economy.
  • Subtle differences in the upbringing of boys and girls could set the scene for inequality at work, research shows. Over 10,000 boys and girls in single-sex schools with surprising results.
  • Despite a series of suicides by high-profile chefs, conditions have not improved in Australian restaurant kitchens according to one UQ Business School researcher who is exploring ways to create change.
  • Technology has severed the chains which once bound workers to their desks. Today your fellow team members could be operating from almost any location – the coffee shop around the corner, or the other side of the world.

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  • From showrooming to virgin consumers we’re tripping over new business buzzwords at every turn. Are they simply jargon or do they tell us something about today’s rapidly changing business landscape that we should be listening to?
  • The Australian Government’s first Cyber Crime and Security Report was launched this month, with statistics showing that cyber crime has become ever more targeted and much more efficient. UQ Business School’s Dr Peter Clutterbuck suggests there is still plenty that businesses can do to protect their data integrity.
  • We clock up 189 million hours of online video each year in Australia. Business and corporate videos are the second most popular content category, after entertainment. Do you know where to look for the latest and greatest online business video insights?
  • Consider the emerging business trends and think forward. What new skills in information management, healthcare and innovation will take the businesses of 2020 and beyond towards a prosperous future?
  • Robots are moving off the assembly line, into other areas of work. Businesses will need to adapt to take advantage of the benefits that robots can offer, while managing the impact on their human workforce. The mantras of organisational change management, leadership and culture will take on new and very real meaning.
  • Between us we’ve downloaded 11 apps for every man, woman and child on earth - and not everyone has a smart phone. Yet. We take a look at a few apps that are emerging for business use. It’s just a sample. Do you have more to add?
  • In the 1950s Australia was the lucky country. Under Hawke we became the clever country. But are good fortune and bright ideas enough? UQ Business School's Professor Mark Dodgson argues that we must become the innovative country since innovation is the driver of future economic growth.
  • NEXT? began with a question at UQ Business School. What if we gathered the brightest future-thinkers and discussed what’s next for business?
  • Cost overruns are threatening investment in the oil and gas industry. Does this mean a shift overseas? If companies focus on innovation, collaboration and deepening competitive capabilities, Australia's energy industry can continue to compete globally.

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  • Trust. Jack Welch, former Chair and CEO of General Electric, believed it was the only way to get employees to do their best. Yet in turbulent times, and in the face of economic crises, trust is often under threat. How do companies build trust? And when trust is lost, what can be done?
  • What do businesses that grow fast have in common? If we knew that, we could bottle it.
  • Futurists meet a need. In the midst of relentless and constant change, CEOs are looking for tools to manage uncertainty and reduce risk. But that’s not all. Business leaders don’t simply want to prepare for change; they want to influence it.
  • From showrooming to virgin consumers we’re tripping over new business buzzwords at every turn. Are they simply jargon or do they tell us something about today’s rapidly changing business landscape that we should be listening to?
  • The Australian Government’s first Cyber Crime and Security Report was launched this month, with statistics showing that cyber crime has become ever more targeted and much more efficient. UQ Business School’s Dr Peter Clutterbuck suggests there is still plenty that businesses can do to protect their data integrity.
  • Renowned business mentor John Bittleston has had a 60-year career in business. In the first of two interviews with Momentum, he recalls how he found his first mentor at the age of 13 when a ploughman taught him how to create a straight furrow across a field by fixing his eyes on a tree at the other end. He discusses his own approach to mentoring and the importance of helping people to find their own ‘tree’.
  • Team building can be challenging if the members are thousands of miles apart. However research has indicated ways to help virtual teams manage conflicts and become high performers.
  • The appointment of a CEO is a landmark event for any company but the selection process is generally shrouded in secrecy.
  • Renowned business mentor John Bittleston has had a business career spanning 60 years. In his latest article he discusses the challenges facing SMEs, and explains why managers need to learn disobedience and improve their forecasting skills.

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