Momentum

Keeping you up-to-date on the latest business thinking, research insights and expert opinion. Subscribe to get Momentum updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe

Pages

  • Why are so many of us willing to let a stranger sleep in our bed? New research suggests that money is not the only motivation.
  • The Paris climate change summit will trigger a new wave of cleantech investment. The breakthroughs it brings will drive economic growth and create new jobs and prosperity.

  • Concerns over missed social opportunities can be a major driver for Millennials, as the travel industry has discovered.
  • We take a look at a few useful business podcasts that could pep up your journey, and make you more effective when you get there.
  • Momentum takes a look at doing good. And why it might just be the best business decision you ever make.
  • Australian retailers are losing out in the competition for online sales, as consumers now spend more money with overseas websites than those from home-grown companies. Here are some lessons retailers could learn from their foreign competitors.
  • Tired of working long hours as an owner manager? By taking a step back, you can improve your quality of life and will be in a better position to take the business forward.
  • Boards are not just for big companies – the knowledge and contacts that experienced board members bring can help small companies to fast track their growth.
  • Team building can be challenging if the members are thousands of miles apart. However research has indicated ways to help virtual teams manage conflicts and become high performers.

Pages

  • Millions of Australians are involved in community sport, yet clubs’ existence often depends on alcohol sales and sponsorship.
  • Cloud computing can offer real benefits for business but it also brings new challenges. Dr Micheal Axelsen, an IT expert from UQ Business School, says businesses need to understand the risks and address them.
  • Fintech offers easy access to banking for millions of people in developing countries, but regulators need to find better ways to address the risks, says Dr Mamiza Haq
  • Globalisation has lifted millions out of poverty but many people feel ignored by the system, says Paul Brewer. In the wake of Trump and Brexit, governments must beware of complacency.
  • Corporate sponsorship of charities is on the rise and offers benefits for both sides – though choosing the wrong partner can damage reputations. Now research has cast new light on what makes a successful sponsorship deal.
  • Traditional businesses in Indonesia are facing a fresh challenge, as the new generation of graduates exposed to western ideas are starting to rebel against authoritarian management styles and the subservient role expected of them.
  • Your cultural background may determine how you react to bad customer service, suggests a study led by UQ Business School and conducted across the US, Australia, Thailand and China. Companies seeking to expand internationally, beware, one culture's polite complaint can be another culture's outraged outburst.
  • Companies involved in corporate scandals often put the blame on rogue employees. However new research has found that in most cases, the company’s organisational design is to blame. So what can be done to help prevent such incidents in the future?
  • Low pay is no longer just a problem for the poor – it can have a damaging effect on business and the economy too, according to a leading economist.

Pages

  • Aristotle's writings still have relevance for business today, says Professor Bernard McKenna. Perhaps the CEOs of the big banks ought to read them.
  • As finance departments face ever greater reporting demands, it is time to rethink the whole finance function and find ways to cut costs and improve the quality of management information.
  • The Islamic finance sector has seen rapid growth since the financial crisis. But is it really less risky than conventional banking – and how will new regulations affect the industry?
  • It might not be on their list of strategic markets, however the Big Four could be making a mistake by neglecting Iran’s potential.
  • A better understanding of culture can help Australia’s entry into the Asian market. But how can we find better ways to train managers to build insights and cultural knowledge?
  • The Paris climate change summit will trigger a new wave of cleantech investment. The breakthroughs it brings will drive economic growth and create new jobs and prosperity.

  • The movie The Big Short focuses on the events leading up to the financial crisis. However, according to Professor Anne Wyatt and Professor Peter Wells, the root of the problem lay in US policies introduced decades before.
  • Impact investing is still a new concept within financial circles, but one which could see billions of dollars channelled into addressing social problems. How can Australia make the most of it?
  • It's close to a quarter of a century since the People's Republic of China embraced the symbol of the capitalist economy: the share market. UQ Business School's Caroline Chen says reforms over recent years are improving corporate governance and will have a knock on effect for investor confidence. But the playing field isn't quite level yet.

Pages

  • Technology has severed the chains which once bound workers to their desks. Today your fellow team members could be operating from almost any location – the coffee shop around the corner, or the other side of the world.
  • Traditional business thinking often operates with a one-eyed pursuit of economic growth, trapping leaders in a world that no longer exists. A new model by entrepreneur expert, Dr Lance Newey aims to offer a better way forward.
  • Innovation is the holy grail for today’s businesses – the hidden force that helps them adapt to changing demand, drive sustained growth and dominate their markets. So why are some companies able to continually reinvent themselves and stay at the forefront of their industry when others struggle to keep up?
  • Business model innovation can allow companies to transcend the competition and dominate their industry. However, not all innovations are created equal. Here is some advice on how to press the reset button.
  • Is the digital hospital roll out helping to improve patient care, or is it a waste of public money? A report by UQ Business School expert offers an independent verdict.
  • An economist is returning to his roots to explore ways to help smallholder family farms to innovate, improve productivity and increase family income.
  • Innovation has never been more important or moved so fast. Here Professor Mark Dodgson, an internationally renowned innovation expert from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School, outlines the latest thinking on innovation, based on current research and insights from the technology revolutions in the past.
  • It’s blamed for pushing up property prices and squeezing out locals, yet Airbnb and similar platforms could offer potential community and economic benefits too. Should Australia follow American cities and regulate short-term rentals?
  • Facebook offers new ways to communicate in a crisis. Research reveals how to use it effectively.

Pages

  • Non-humans are moving into frontline roles. But would you really want to work with a robot – and can they offer long-term value to a business? New research helps leaders prepare for the future workforce.
  • Subtle differences in the upbringing of boys and girls could set the scene for inequality at work, research shows. Over 10,000 boys and girls in single-sex schools with surprising results.
  • Despite a series of suicides by high-profile chefs, conditions have not improved in Australian restaurant kitchens according to one UQ Business School researcher who is exploring ways to create change.
  • Technology has severed the chains which once bound workers to their desks. Today your fellow team members could be operating from almost any location – the coffee shop around the corner, or the other side of the world.
  • Traditional business thinking often operates with a one-eyed pursuit of economic growth, trapping leaders in a world that no longer exists. A new model by entrepreneur expert, Dr Lance Newey aims to offer a better way forward.
  • Business model innovation can allow companies to transcend the competition and dominate their industry. However, not all innovations are created equal. Here is some advice on how to press the reset button.
  • People are the most important factor in a business. However, recent research has found that some traditional Human Resource (HR) practices are ineffective. Is it time for a new approach?
  • "The finance industry’s narrow focus on creating shareholder value often has unintended consequences," says UQ Business School’s Professor Karen Benson. "It’s time for a new approach."
  • A study which set out to investigate what holds back women’s careers offers some useful insights into how to build confidence in children of both sexes.

Pages

Pages

  • Major sporting events cost millions, but their impact is often confined to the host city. New research has revealed how other areas can be winners too.
  • Cost overruns are threatening investment in the oil and gas industry. Does this mean a shift overseas? If companies focus on innovation, collaboration and deepening competitive capabilities, Australia's energy industry can continue to compete globally.
  • Working with local communities is different to dealing with other types of customers or stakeholders. However the ability to engage with them and win their support is a valuable skill that offers opportunities to generate both profit and social value, says social entrepreneurship expert Dr Lance Newey.
  • While companies in general have been slow to embrace sustainability, some corporates and smaller companies have placed it at the heart of their business and are now using it to develop new markets and secure their long-term future. Others can follow their example by starting with a few simple steps.
  • The increase in extreme weather indicates that climate change is already here, yet so far there has been little discussion of how it will affect business. The Climate Resilient Organization, a new book by Dr Martina Linnenluecke and Professor Andrew Griffiths of UQ Business School, considers what actions companies can take. In this interview, Dr Linnenluecke explains why they need to adapt and build their resilience.
  • The carbon tax, the cost of raw materials, lobbying from environmentalists: the pressure on business to be environmentally responsible is intense. But can sustainable development – the combination of economic growth and ecological balance – be a business reality? UQ Business School’s Professor Peter Clarkson asks under what circumstances business can turn green practice into profit?
  • Recent research emerging from the UQ Business School shows that companies large and small are finding innovative and unique responses to the challenges and broader issues of sustainability and climate change.
  • This month the Green Buildings Council of Australia launches the pilot Green Stars – Communities initiative, an independent, national scheme that aims to certify the sustainability of community level projects. Associate Professor Clive Warren at UQ Business School, an expert in green building rating in the commercial office space, asks: who needs a green star rating and how do we know what it’s worth?
  • Can insurers or reinsurers change our behaviour and help us adapt to climate change? Australia’s obsession with sea changes, waterfront properties and coastal living has a dark side that will make its presence inevitably and abundantly felt in coming years.

Pages