Momentum

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  • From millennials to boomers, everyday people are using readily-accessible technology and a shared sense of disenfranchisement to beat the Bastille of Wall Street. Their actions are likely to shape the future of financial service as we know it.
  • Research from the UQ Business School discovered female CEOs and founders still operate at a disadvantage in industries perceived as male-dominated when pitching for capital. The good news is there are promising opportunities to correct the trend. Discover four pitching tips to beat bias.
  • If you’re considering a career change, you’re not alone. Hear from UQ Business School experts and UQ MBA alumnus Suzanne Wood, who changed careers during the pandemic, for the tips and advice you’re looking for.
  • This year, leaders and teams were tested more than ever before – navigating hardship, dealing with increased levels of remote work and balancing wellbeing. To help set a positive course for the new year, UQ Business School researchers share their insights on the top 5 leadership trends that will dominate the business landscape in 2021 and beyond.
  • UQ researchers have discovered domestic travel to Australian wineries produces a much lower environmental footprint than international travel. With national wineries leading sustainability innovation worldwide, you can now sip your way to sustainability by supporting local businesses.
  • Even though we interact with some form of artificial intelligence (AI) every day, a new report from UQ Business School researchers discovered two-thirds of Australians don’t trust AI systems. This raises the question: What does this mean for the future of Australian businesses?
  • As Australia emerges from a winter hibernation unlike any experienced before, many small businesses are struggling to stay afloat. Top UQ business and law experts share their top strategies to help small businesses take stock, pivot and innovate to avoid an insolvency spiral.
  • The global COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a series of changes to the way we work. From suddenly managing teams working remotely to employees experiencing hardship – the crisis has led to many new leadership challenges. According to Professor Neal Ashkanasy (OAM), leaders now more than ever need to have a sharpened awareness of emotional intelligence and how to use it.
  • Most people say they care about their personal information being shared online. However, a much smaller percentage of people actually take the necessary actions to preserve their privacy. Dr Ivano Bongiovanni discusses why actions don’t always match beliefs when it comes to data.

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  • Concerns over missed social opportunities can be a major driver for Millennials, as the travel industry has discovered.
  • We take a look at a few useful business podcasts that could pep up your journey, and make you more effective when you get there.
  • Momentum takes a look at doing good. And why it might just be the best business decision you ever make.
  • Australian retailers are losing out in the competition for online sales, as consumers now spend more money with overseas websites than those from home-grown companies. Here are some lessons retailers could learn from their foreign competitors.
  • Tired of working long hours as an owner manager? By taking a step back, you can improve your quality of life and will be in a better position to take the business forward.
  • Boards are not just for big companies – the knowledge and contacts that experienced board members bring can help small companies to fast track their growth.
  • Team building can be challenging if the members are thousands of miles apart. However research has indicated ways to help virtual teams manage conflicts and become high performers.
  • Credit rating agencies wield considerable power in the global financial system. With one of the big three agencies, Standard & Poor’s, being sued for $5 billion by the US department of justice, we look at what credit ratings do and why they are all over the news.
  • Robots are moving off the assembly line, into other areas of work. Businesses will need to adapt to take advantage of the benefits that robots can offer, while managing the impact on their human workforce. The mantras of organisational change management, leadership and culture will take on new and very real meaning.

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  • Cloud computing can offer real benefits for business but it also brings new challenges. Dr Micheal Axelsen, an IT expert from UQ Business School, says businesses need to understand the risks and address them.
  • Fintech offers easy access to banking for millions of people in developing countries, but regulators need to find better ways to address the risks, says Dr Mamiza Haq
  • Globalisation has lifted millions out of poverty but many people feel ignored by the system, says Paul Brewer. In the wake of Trump and Brexit, governments must beware of complacency.
  • Corporate sponsorship of charities is on the rise and offers benefits for both sides – though choosing the wrong partner can damage reputations. Now research has cast new light on what makes a successful sponsorship deal.
  • Traditional businesses in Indonesia are facing a fresh challenge, as the new generation of graduates exposed to western ideas are starting to rebel against authoritarian management styles and the subservient role expected of them.
  • Your cultural background may determine how you react to bad customer service, suggests a study led by UQ Business School and conducted across the US, Australia, Thailand and China. Companies seeking to expand internationally, beware, one culture's polite complaint can be another culture's outraged outburst.
  • Companies involved in corporate scandals often put the blame on rogue employees. However new research has found that in most cases, the company’s organisational design is to blame. So what can be done to help prevent such incidents in the future?
  • Low pay is no longer just a problem for the poor – it can have a damaging effect on business and the economy too, according to a leading economist.
  • New research suggests that Australia’s controversial law to curb excessive executive pay has met with some success – but at a price.

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  • The Islamic finance sector has seen rapid growth since the financial crisis. But is it really less risky than conventional banking – and how will new regulations affect the industry?
  • It might not be on their list of strategic markets, however the Big Four could be making a mistake by neglecting Iran’s potential.
  • A better understanding of culture can help Australia’s entry into the Asian market. But how can we find better ways to train managers to build insights and cultural knowledge?
  • The Paris climate change summit will trigger a new wave of cleantech investment. The breakthroughs it brings will drive economic growth and create new jobs and prosperity.

  • The movie The Big Short focuses on the events leading up to the financial crisis. However, according to Professor Anne Wyatt and Professor Peter Wells, the root of the problem lay in US policies introduced decades before.
  • Impact investing is still a new concept within financial circles, but one which could see billions of dollars channelled into addressing social problems. How can Australia make the most of it?
  • International forces are reshaping the world of business, but also creating new opportunities and a more level playing field for small firms.
  • It's close to a quarter of a century since the People's Republic of China embraced the symbol of the capitalist economy: the share market. UQ Business School's Caroline Chen says reforms over recent years are improving corporate governance and will have a knock on effect for investor confidence. But the playing field isn't quite level yet.
  • Property expert Associate Professor Clive Warren explains the underlying factors affecting the property market and answers the question everyone is asking.

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  • An economist is returning to his roots to explore ways to help smallholder family farms to innovate, improve productivity and increase family income.
  • Innovation has never been more important or moved so fast. Here Professor Mark Dodgson, an internationally renowned innovation expert from The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School, outlines the latest thinking on innovation, based on current research and insights from the technology revolutions in the past.
  • It’s blamed for pushing up property prices and squeezing out locals, yet Airbnb and similar platforms could offer potential community and economic benefits too. Should Australia follow American cities and regulate short-term rentals?
  • Facebook offers new ways to communicate in a crisis. Research reveals how to use it effectively.
  • Cloud computing can offer real benefits for business but it also brings new challenges. Dr Micheal Axelsen, an IT expert from UQ Business School, says businesses need to understand the risks and address them.
  • As the system behind Bitcoin, blockchain was once seen as the domain of arms dealers and money launderers. However it is now recognised as an important technology in its own right.
  • A technique developed by a lecturer to engage students in class could provide added interest to business seminars and training
  • Healthcare IT projects have a poor track record – so why did the digital transformation of Princess Alexandra Hospital succeed when so many others have gone disastrously wrong?
  • Innovation is the key to a better future for Australians – but we need to take pride in our past achievements to convince people of the benefits, says Professor Mark Dodgson.

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  • Working with local communities is different to dealing with other types of customers or stakeholders. However the ability to engage with them and win their support is a valuable skill that offers opportunities to generate both profit and social value, says social entrepreneurship expert Dr Lance Newey.
  • While companies in general have been slow to embrace sustainability, some corporates and smaller companies have placed it at the heart of their business and are now using it to develop new markets and secure their long-term future. Others can follow their example by starting with a few simple steps.
  • The increase in extreme weather indicates that climate change is already here, yet so far there has been little discussion of how it will affect business. The Climate Resilient Organization, a new book by Dr Martina Linnenluecke and Professor Andrew Griffiths of UQ Business School, considers what actions companies can take. In this interview, Dr Linnenluecke explains why they need to adapt and build their resilience.
  • The carbon tax, the cost of raw materials, lobbying from environmentalists: the pressure on business to be environmentally responsible is intense. But can sustainable development – the combination of economic growth and ecological balance – be a business reality? UQ Business School’s Professor Peter Clarkson asks under what circumstances business can turn green practice into profit?
  • Recent research emerging from the UQ Business School shows that companies large and small are finding innovative and unique responses to the challenges and broader issues of sustainability and climate change.
  • This month the Green Buildings Council of Australia launches the pilot Green Stars – Communities initiative, an independent, national scheme that aims to certify the sustainability of community level projects. Associate Professor Clive Warren at UQ Business School, an expert in green building rating in the commercial office space, asks: who needs a green star rating and how do we know what it’s worth?
  • Can insurers or reinsurers change our behaviour and help us adapt to climate change? Australia’s obsession with sea changes, waterfront properties and coastal living has a dark side that will make its presence inevitably and abundantly felt in coming years.
  • For the next in our series big data we look at how data capture and analysis is starting to transform the management of our most precious resource: water.

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